A BIRD IN THE HAND IS WORTH TWO IN THE BUSH

A BIRD IN THE HAND IS WORTH TWO IN THE BUSH
A BIRD IN THE HAND IS WORTH TWO IN THE BUSH

A BIRD IN THE HAND IS WORTH TWO IN THE BUSH

A BIRD IN THE HAND IS WORTH TWO IN THE BUSH

Meaning

1.) What you already have is more valuable than the prospect to have something greater.
2.) It is better to be content with what you have than risk losing it by trying to get something better.

Idiom Example 

Bob: “I think I’m gonna quit my job..another firm is going to offer me a better job.”
Joe: “Are you sure? You probably shouldn’t quit unless you know you’re gonna get in for sure. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.”

I think I’ll keep my modest winnings rather than wagering them all on the next horse race. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.

Origin

This idiom, warns against taking risks. In addition, it suggests that you should keep what you have and not risk losing it by going after more. The other reading of the meaning is that it refers to medieval falcon.In ancient times   a bird in the hand  was a valuable asset. And worth more than two in the bush (the prey).

The first citation of the expression in print in its currently used form is found in John Ray’s A Hand-book of Proverbs, 1670, in which he lists it as:

A [also ‘one’] bird in the hand is worth two in the bush

bird in handBy how long the phrase predates Ray’s publication isn’t clear, as variants of it were known for centuries before 1670. The earliest English version of the proverb is from the Bible and was translated into English in Wycliffe’s version in 1382, although Latin texts have it from the 13th century:

Ecclesiastes IX – A living dog is better than a dead lion.

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